Brandt Named Patty Kaz Top-3 Finalist

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March 6, 2014

USA Hockey Release | Patty Kazmaier Award

MINNEAPOLIS - Sophomore forward Hannah Brandt (Vadnais Heights, Minn.) has been named a top-three finalist for the 2014 Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award, USA Hockey announced today.

Sophomore Hannah Brandt


Brandt joins Clarkson senior forward Jamie Lee Rattray and Cornell junior forward Jillian Saulnier as top-three finalists for the top honor in NCAA Division I women's ice hockey.

Brandt leads the nation in points (61), assists (40) and assists per game (1.11). She is tied for ninth in the NCAA in goals (21) and tied for 14th in game-winning goals (4). The sophomore leads the WCHA in points (46) and assists (30) in conference play and is tied for second in goals (16).

The Vadnais Heights, Minn., native was named the WCHA Preseason Player of the Year and has been named WCHA Offensive Player of the Week once this season. She was honored as a 2014 WCHA Scholar Athlete as well. Off the ice, Brandt has volunteered with the University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital, Special Olympics of Minnesota, Roseville Youth Hockey Association, Minneapolis Youth Hockey Association, University of Minnesota Medical Center Fairview Hospital, Hope Kids and the Maplewood Care Center.

The 2014 Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award will be presented at a brunch ceremony at Oakdale Theatre in Wallingford, Conn., on Saturday, March 22, as part of the NCAA Women's Frozen Four weekend hosted by Quinnipiac University. The award, which is in its 17th year, is presented annually to the top player in NCAA Division I women's ice hockey.

Minnesota junior forward Rachael Bona (Coon Rapids, Minn.) was among the top-10 finalists for the 2014 award as the Gophers and Clarkson each had two top-10 honorees. Brandt was the lone repeat honoree among the top-10 finalists this year as she was also a top-10 finalist in 2013.

Amanda Kessel became the second Golden Gopher all-time to win the prestigious Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award when she took home the award last season. Krissy Wendell was Minnesota's first Patty Kaz winner in 2005.

The selection process for the 2014 award recipient commenced in early February when NCAA Division I women's ice hockey coaches were asked to nominate players for the award. Players who were nominated by two or more coaches were then placed on an official ballot, which was sent back to the coaches to vote for the top-10 finalists.

The three finalists, including the recipient of the 2014 Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award, were then chosen by a 13-person selection committee made up of NCAA Division I women's ice hockey coaches, representatives of print and broadcast media, an at-large member and a representative of USA Hockey, the national governing body for the sport of ice hockey in the United States. The independent accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP, tabulated the ballots.

Meghan Duggan, captain of the 2014 U.S. Olympic Women's Ice Hockey Team and 2011 Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award winner, will serve as the keynote speaker. Tickets to the 2014 Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award Ceremony and Brunch are on sale now. Individual seats to the event are $65, while tables of 10 are available for $600. A select number of sponsorships are also available.

About the Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award

An award of The USA Hockey Foundation, the Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award is annually presented to the top player in NCAA Division I women's ice hockey. Selection criteria includes outstanding individual and team skills, sportsmanship, performance in the clutch, personal character, competitiveness and a love of hockey. Consideration is also given to academic achievement and civic involvement.

About Patty Kazmaier

The Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award is named in honor of the late Patty Kazmaier, who was a four-year varsity letter-winner and All-Ivy League defenseman at Princeton University from 1981-86. An accomplished athlete who helped lead the Tigers to the Ivy League Championship in three consecutive seasons (1981-84), Patty Kazmaier-Sandt died on Feb. 15, 1990, at the age of 28 following a long struggle with a rare blood disease.

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