Compliance

Gambling Compliance
Defining Gambling
The NCAA strictly prohibits student-athletes and athletics department's staff members from engaging in the following activities:
Soliciting a bet on any intercollegiate or professional team;

Accepting a bet on any team representing the institution;

Soliciting or accepting a bet on any intercollegiate or professional competition for any item (e.g. cash, shirt, dinner) that has tangible value;

Engaging in gambling activities that do not involve the outcome of contests (e.g., fantasy leagues, picking the top scorer);

Participating in any gambling activity that involves intercollegiate athletics or professional athletics through a bookmaker, a parlay card, or any other method employed by organized gambling;

Providing information to individuals involved in organized gambling activities concerning intercollegiate athletics competition; or

Engaging in activities designed to influence the outcome of an intercollegiate contest or in an effort to affect win-loss margins (i.e., "point shaving").
 
*Cash is not the only prohibited item to be used as a wager in gambling. It is also impermissible to bet with any other item that has tangible value, such as a shirt or a meal. Also, providing information about a student-athlete to individuals involved in organized gambling activities is considered participation in a gambling activity and is prohibited.
 
Consequences Associated with Gambling
The NCAA is very clear regarding their stance on gambling and the consequences associated with sports wagering. The moment a student-athlete is discovered to have made a bet of any kind on any college or professional sport or has given information to someone who does gamble, the following will occur:

Student-athlete's involved in activities designed to influence the outcome or win/loss margins (i.e. point shaving) will be ruled permanently ineligible.

Student-athlete's involved in accepting or soliciting bets on their own institution will be ruled permanently ineligible.

Student-athlete's involved in any other type of sport wagering through organized gambling shall lose at least one-year of all eligibility.
 
Another consequence of gambling is addiction. Student-athletes have been found to be particularly vulnerable when it comes to gambling due to their competitive nature and familiarity with the sports world. Many studies have shown compulsive gamblers constitute about 5 percent of the U.S. population, and 90 percent of compulsive gamblers place their first bet before the age of 14. Consequences of gambling go far beyond being deemed ineligible. Bankruptcy and prison are ultimately what's at stake.

Isenberg, M., Rhoads, R. (2007, January 15). Educational actions combat gambling. The NCAA News, p.4

Compliance
(report violations anonymously)